Virtual Machines

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Overview

Virtual machines are based on templates and are deployed on hypervisors. Hypervisors give them access to CPU, disk and network resources. Cloud1 gives you high-end cloud management features including:

  • Automatic VM deployment
  • Automatic IP allocation
  • Setting firewall rules
  • Manual build option
  • Customizable backups
  • Hot and cold migration
  • VM performance monitoring
  • Load balancing and autoscaling

Manage VM's

Users in Cloud1 have full control over the lifecycle of Virtual machines. Virtual Machines can be in the following states:

  • Created - A machine is created when you successfully Add New Virtual Machine from the Virtual Machines menu, having selected its template and set its properties, resources and network requirements.
  • Build - A Virtual Machine must be built after it is created. Building is the process of actually allocating the physical resources specified during its creation. This can be done manually, or automatically if you check the Build virtual machine automatically box during the creation process.
  • Powered on - A power on starts the virtual machine, its operating system and processes.
  • Powered off - If the operating system cannot be stopped, it will be forcefully terminated.
  • Shut down - A shut down will attempt to gracefully stop a virtual machine and its operating system, which typically involves terminating all running applications.
  • Rebooted - Rebooted means a virtual machine has been shut down, and then powered on again.
  • Deleted - When a virtual machine is deleted, its backups are still stored on the server and can be restored if required.
  • Re-built - To rebuild a virtual machine means to reinstall the template and reconfigure the resources and network. All data will be lost.
  • Failed - A failed virtual machine is one that is down, for example because of hardware or network

Create VM's

Virtual machines are created from templates. To create a virtual machine:

  • On your Control Panel’s dashboard, click the Create New Virtual Machine button (or go to the Virtual Machines menu, and click the Add New Virtual Machine button).
  • Fill in the form that appears:
    • Properties
      • Give your virtual machine a label and a hostname. The hostname should consist of letters [A-Za-z], digits [0-9] and dash [ - ]. For more info on hostname validation, refer to RFC standard documentation.
      • Choose a hypervisor zone to build this VM on.
      • Choose a specific hypervisor to build this VM on.
      • Give your virtual machine a secure password. It can consist of 6-32 characters, letters [A-Za-z], digits [0-9], dash [ - ] and lower dash [ _ ]. You can use both lowerand uppercase letters.
    • Template
      • If there are fewer than 10 templates available in the system, they will all be listed in the Templates drop-down box. Select the template you need.
      • If there are more than 10 templates available, fill in the following fields:
      • Operating system - choose an OS from the drop-down box (Windows, Linux or FreeBSD)
      • Distribution - choose a template Distribution
      • Template - choose a specific template from the list.
    • Windows Licensing Type
      • This option only appears if your billing plan allows it, and if the relevant licensing options have been configured for the template group this template belongs to. If this option is available, choose the license type you require:
      • For the KMS type, choose the licensing server
      • For your own license, type your license key
      • If you don't specify the licensing type, MAK licensing will be set by default.
    • Resources
      • Set the resources needed for this VM: RAM, CPU cores.
    • Primary disk
      • Choose a data store zone for this VM’s primary disk.
      • Set the primary disk size.
    • Swap disk
      • Choose a data store zone for this VM’s swap disk.
      • Set the swap disk size.
There is no swap disk for Windows-based VMs. In all other cases, swap disk size must be greater than zero.
    • Network configuration
      • Choose a network zone and set the port speed for this VM.
You can’t select unlimited port speed if the Network Zone is not selected. In this case the port speed will be 1 by default.
It's possible to create virtual machine with unlimited network speed without selecting a network zone only if you have only one Network Zone assigned to your billing plan.
      • If the option is available, you can also assign an IP address for the VM from the drop-down menu. Indicate HV and network to have the list of available IPs.
    • Automation settings
      • Tick the Build Virtual Machine Automatically box if you want the system to automatically build the VM. If you leave this box blank, you will have to build your machine manually after it is created.
      • Tick the Automatic backup box if you want this VM to be backed up automatically (daily, weekly, monthly and yearly backup).
      • Tick the Enable autoscale box if you wish to set autoscaling rules for this VM.
  • Click the Create Virtual Machine button to start the creation process. You will be taken to the virtual machine details screen.

Build VMs manually

If you haven’t checked the Build Virtual Machine Automatically option during the VM creation process, you will have to do this manually after the VM has been created. Building a virtual machine is the process of allocating physical resources to that VM. To build a virtual machine manually:

  1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
  2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
  3. On the screen that appears, scroll down to the Actions section and click Build Virtual Machine.
  4. On the screen that pops up, use the drop-down menu to choose a template with which to build the VM.
  5. Tick the Required Start Up box to have your VM started automatically after it is built.
  6. Click the Build Virtual Machine button to finish.

View VMs

  • To view all virtual machines deployed in the cloud:
    • Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu to see an overview of all virtual machines in the cloud: their name, IP addresses, power status (with on/off buttons), and allocated disk size and RAM.
    • From here you also have quick access to the Statistics screen for each virtual machine, where you can see its CPU usage, and the Backups screen for each machine. Click the relevant icon in each case.
  • To see detailed information about a specific virtual machine:
    • Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    • On the screen that appears, use the top menu to manage your virtual machines. The schematic menu navigation with the references to appropriate sections is represented below.
    • Overview
      • Properties - show VM information and gives access to most of the VM actions.
      • CPU Usage
      • Billing Statistics
      • Autoscaling
      • Console
    • Networking
      • Network Interfaces - manage VM network
      • Firewall
      • IP Addresses
    • Storage
      • Disks - give access to VM disks and backups
      • Backups

VM Properties

To access main actions and information on VMs, go to Overview -> Properties tab. VM information gives general overview of the VM details:

  • Hostname and login
  • Power status & On/Off buttons
  • Template this VM is built on
  • Resources for this VM
  • Hypervisor, network and IP
  • Owner
  • Prices per hour
  • Activity log

Actions menu enables you to perform main action on VMs (the exact list shown depends on the VM status)

  • Startup Virtual Machine - Queues a start-up action for a VM that’s currently powered off.
  • Startup on Recovery - Starts the VM in Recovery mode with a temporary login (“root”) and password (“recovery”).
  • Reboot Virtual Machine - Powers off and then restarts the VM.
  • Reboot in Recovery - Powers off and then restarts the VM Recovery mode with a temporary login (“root”) and password (“recovery”).
  • Edit Firewall Rules – Redirects you to Networking -> Firewall menu, where you can set firewall rules.
  • Edit Administrator’s Note – Makes an optional note, which will be displayed in VM Information.
  • Rebuild Network - Rebuilds network join, added to this VM (required after allocating new IP addresses).
  • Set SSH keys –assigns SSH keys of the admin and a VM owner to the VM. If a VM owner does not have any SSH keys, the system will assign only admin keys.
  • Suspend Virtual Machine - Stops a VM, changes its status to suspended and disables all the other actions on VM, unless unsuspended.
  • Migrate Virtual Machine - Pops up the VM migration dialogue, enabling you to move the VM to a different hypervisor.
  • Reset Root Password - Resets the root password for this VM (the password is displayed in VM Information).
  • Rebuild Virtual Machine - Pops up the VM rebuild dialogue, where you can rebuild the VM on the same (or another) template. All data will be lost!
  • Adjust Resource Allocation - Opens the Adjust Resource Allocations screen for resizing this VM, where you can change number of CPUs, size of RAM, CPU priority and change VM label. Note, that resizing the VM may lead to reboot (depends on the template)!
  • Segregate Virtual Machine – Pops up a drop-down menu where you may choose a VM to keep away from (your VM will never be booted on the same hypervisor as specified VM).
  • Change Owner - Pops up a dialogue box with a drop-down of all users on the system, enabling you to pass ownership of the VM to the user selected from the list.
  • Shut Down Virtual Machine – Pops up a dialog box, where you can either Shut Down VM (terminates the VM gracefully), or Power Off VM (terminates the VM forcefully).
  • Delete Virtual Machine - Removes the VM from the system.
  • Go to Load Balancer – (displayed in case this VM is a node of a LB) – Redirects to the Load Balancer screen.

Adjust Resource Allocation

You can adjust CPU and RAM resources for all VMs. Depending on the OS it is built on, some VMs can have their CPU and RAM resized without needing to be powered off (“resize without reboot”).

 Windows 2008 and Windows 7 VMs can be resized without rebooting: Windows 2003 requires a reboot. With Linux it depends on kernel. E.g. CentOS with kernel 2.6.18 can be resized; 
Ubuntu cannot. Whether a template allows resize without reboot is shown on the main Templates menu screen. 
  • To adjust VM CPU & RAM resources:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the machine you want to resize, to show its details screen.
    3. Click the Adjust Resource Allocation link in the Actions section of the details screen.
    4. Change CPU core/priority and RAM values , and click the Save Virtual Machine button:
    5. If the VM template allows resize without reboot, the resize should be completed automatically: you will be returned to the VM details screen and see a message indicating the resize was successful.
    6. If the template does not allow this, you will be asked to confirm that the VM will need rebooting so that the resize can take place.

Migrate VMs

Cloud1 allows hot and cold migration of virtual machines between hosts that share common data stores (or data store zones). Hot migration means moving virtual machines that are running, while cold migration means moving virtual machines that are shut down.

 Hot migration is not available for virtual machines based on Windows 2003. They must be cold migrated (that is, once they have been shut down).
  • To hot migrate a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you want to migrate.
    3. In the Actions section, click the Migrate Virtual Machine link.
    4. In the window that appears, choose the target hypervisor from the drop-down menu.
    5. Click the Start to Migrate button.

After migration, the Power status of your virtual machine remains as it was before the move. If you migrate a virtual machine that’s running, the whole process is almost unnoticeable.

Autoscale VMs

VM autoscaling allows you to automatically increase the RAM, CPU and disk size of a virtual machine. VM resources are scaled based on rules you specify. For example, you can set up a rule that will add 1000MB of memory to a VM if RAM usage has been above 90% for the last 10 minutes - but add no more than 5000MB in total in 24 hours. Once the RAM, CPU and disk size are increased, the values are not scaled down.

For Linux-based VMs only:
If the VM is based on Xen and the template allows resizing without reboot - see the Adjust Resource Allocation section – then virtual machine RAM and CPU will be increased without rebooting the VM.
Disk space autoscaling requires a VM reboot.
 
If you autoscale a VM’s memory to a value greater than current VM RAM x 16 , the VM will be rebooted anyway, regardless of the template it is built on.
  • To configure autoscaling:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the appropriate VM.
    3. On the page that follows, click the Autoscaling tab.
    4. Add autoscaling rules, explained below:
      • If RAM usage exceeds X% for a specific time period, add Y MB – but no more than Z MB in a 24 hour period.
      • If CPU usage exceeds X % for a specific time period, add Y% - but no more than Z% in a 24 hour period.
      • If disk usage exceeds X % for a specific time period, add Y GB - but no more than Z GB in a 24 hour period.
    5. Click Apply.
  • To delete an autoscaling rule:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the appropriate VM.
    3. On the page that follows, click the Autoscaling tab.
    4. Click Delete. This will delete all autoscaling rules.

Segregate VMs

If required, you can instruct Cloud1 to make sure a VM is never booted on the same hypervisor as another specific VM. This may be important if, for example, you have two name servers or a load balanced web server, and you need to keep VMs on separate physical machines.

  • To isolate one VM from another:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you want to segregate.
    3. On the screen that appears, scroll down to the Actions section and click Segregate Virtual Machine.
    4. On the screen that pops up, use the drop-down menu to choose a VM you want to keep away from.
    5. Click the Segregate VM button to finish.

VM Console

Cloud1 offers an integrated VNC console that gives users direct access to their virtual machines through the Cloud1 Control Panel, if their user role permits. Users can access all their virtual machines for maintenance. The console will work on all browsers/OS.

VM Logs

As a user you will have access to logs describing everything that happens to your virtual machines. The following types of transactions are logged:

  • Provision virtual machine
  • Startup virtual machine
  • Stop virtual machine
  • Resize virtual machine without reboot
  • Configure Operating System
  • Build disk
  • Resize disk
  • Format disk
  • Destroy disk
  • Take backup
  • Convert backup
  • Restore backup
  • Destroy backups
  • Destroy virtual machine
  • Destroy template
  • Download template
  • Update firewall
  • To view transactions for a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. The details screen for that virtual machine shows recent transactions in the VM Activity Log section.
  • To cancel pending tasks, click Cancel All Pending Tasks for this virtual machine.

Manage VM Networks

The Networking tab in the Virtual Machines menu enables you to manage network interfaces, allocate IP addresses and set firewall rules for VMs.

Configure Network Interface

The Networking -> Network Interfaces menu shows the virtual network interfaces allocated to this VM. Network interfaces join the physical network to the VM. When you create a VM a network interface is added automatically. This network interface will be assigned to the existing physical network using a spare IP (IPv4) and will be set primary by default. Cloud1 supports IPv4 and IPv6. Since not every application supports IPv6, at least one IPv4 address must be allocated to a VM’s primary network interface.

  • To see the list of all network interfaces allocated to the VM:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Networking -> Network Interfaces tab.
    4. On the page that follows you will see the following fields:
      • Interface – optional label of the network interface.
      • Network join – name of the network and a hypervisor or hypervisor zone this network is joined to.
      • Port speed – the speed set to the interface.
      • Primary interface – indication whether the interface is primary or not.

Here you can also view Interface Usage, Edit and Delete network interface (using icon controls) and Add a new network interface using the button at the bottom of the screen.

  • To add a network interface:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Networking -> Network Interfaces tab.
    4. Click the Add New Network Interface button.
    5. On the screen that appears – input values for the following parameters:
      • Label – a human-friendly name for the new interface.
      • Physical Network – choose a network join from the drop-down menu, which lists network joins assigned to the hypervisor/hypervisor zone on which the VM runs).
      • Port speed – set port speed in Mbps, or make it unlimited.
    6. Click the Add Network Interface button

To edit the network interface label, port speed or set it as primary (if none is marked as primary), click the Edit icon next to the appropriate network interface. After editing the port speed, the Virtual Machine should be power cycled for the change to take effect.

To delete a network interface, click the Delete icon next to the interface you want to delete.

 To run the VM, at least one network interface with an assigned IP address (or addresses) is required! 
To allocate another physical network, add a new network interface

Set Firewall Rules

You can set firewall rules for the network interfaces of virtual machines. There are two types of firewall rule:

  • ACCEPT – defines the packets that will be accepted by the firewall
  • DROP – define the packets that will be rejected by the firewall
  • To configure a rule:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the VM for which you want to configure a firewall rule.
    3. Click the Networking -> Firewall tab.
    4. On the page that appears set the following:
      • Choose the network interface.
      • Specify if the rule defines requests that should be accepted or dropped.
      • Set the IP address for which this rule is active.
        • Leave the empty field to apply this rule to all IPs
        • Enter hyphen-separated IPs to apply the rule to an IP range (e.g. 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.10)
        • Enter the IPs with slash to apply the rule to CIDR (e.g. 192.168.1.1/24)
      • Set the port for which this rule will is effective.
        • Leave the empty field to apply the rule to all ports
        • Enter colon-separated ports to apply the rule to a port range (e.g. 1024:1028)
        • Enter comma-separated ports to apply the rule to the list of ports (e.g. 80,443,21)
        • Choose the protocol (TCP or UDP).
    5. Save the rule. The rule will be saved in the UI, but the transaction won’t be started until you click the Apply Firewall Rules button.
    6. To start the transaction which runs firewall rules for a VM, click Apply firewall rules button.
 Example: the Int1 ACCEPT 122.158.111.21 22 TCP firewall rule means that the Int1 network interface will accept all requests and packets addressed from 122.158.111.21 using the TCP protocol on port 22. 
The Int2 DROP 122.158.111.21 22 UDP firewall rule means that the Int2 network interface will reject all requests and packets from 122.158.111.21 using the UDP protocol on port 22.

Allocate IP Addresses

In the Networking -> IP Addresses tab you can find the list of assigned IP addresses, allocate new IP addresses and rebuild a network.

  • To allocate a new IP Address to the VM
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Networking -> IP Addresses tab.
    4. Click the Allocate New IP Assignment button.
    5. Select a network interface from the drop-down menu (only the network interfaces you added to the VM will be available)
    6. Select an IP address from the IP Pool associated with the network interface. You may select an IP address that’s already assigned to a VM, but only one VM should be online at a time.
    7. Click the Add IP Address Assignment button.
    8. Click the Rebuild Network button to rebuild the network.
 You must rebuild the network after making changes to IP address allocations.
  • To remove an IP address from a VM:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Networking -> IP Addresses tab.
    4. Click the delete icon next to the IP address you want to delete.
    5. In the pop up window that appears:
      • Choose Delete with Reboot option if you want to reboot a VM and rebuild the network immediately after deleting the IP address
      • Choose Delete without Reboot option if you don’t want to reboot a VM. In this case to apply the changes, you will have to the reboot the VM additionally.

Display Network Speed for network interfaces on Virtual Machine page

The main Virtual Machines screen displays the network speed of each VM’s primary network interface.

  • To see the speed of all interfaces assigned to a VM:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machine’s menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you are interested in.
    3. Click the Networking > Network Interfaces tab.
    4. On the screen that appears, the Port Speed column shows the network speed of the network interface.

Edit virtual machine network speed

  • To edit a virtual machine’s network speed:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Select the virtual machine you want to change.
    3. Go to the Network -> Network interfaces tab, and edit the network speed accordingly.
    4. Click the Save Network Interface button to save changes.

Manage VM disk space

Virtual machine storage is provided by disks. A disk is a partition of a data store that is allocated to a specific virtual machine. Disks can be assigned as standard or swap disks (there are no swap disks for Windows based templates). They can also be set as primary (that is, the disk from which an OS will boot). Managing disks for the entire cloud is handled through the Control Panel’s Settings menu. Disks for individual virtual machines are managed through the Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu, where you can:

  • see the list of disks allocated to this VM
  • add new disks
  • resize a disk
  • migrate a disk
  • back up a disk or see already made backups for the disk
  • set backup schedules
  • check disk usage statistics (IOPS)
  • delete a disk

Add disks to a VM

Adding a disk to a virtual machine will require that VM to be rebooted. If a VM is running when you try to add a new disk to it, you’ll be asked to confirm the reboot.

  • To add a disk to a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click a VM’s label to open its details screen.
    3. Click the Storage -> Disks tab.
    4. Click the Add New Disk button.
    5. Fill in the details:
      • Choose the Data Store to create a disk on from the drop-down menu.
      • Set the desired disk size.
      • Specify if this disk is swap space, and requires formatting.
      • Specify whether the disk should be added to Linux FSTAB, and its mount point.
 The maximum length of a Mount Point is 256 characters. Spaces are not allowed. No more than one slash is allowed. 
    1. Click the Add Disk button to finish.
  When you add a new disk to a virtual machine it will automatically become available to that machine. 

Resize VM disks

You can easily resize disks when needed. The resize will fail if your current usage is greater than the new size you request. Note, that any changes on disk size will lead to reboot of your VM.

  • To change disk size:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Make sure your virtual machine is powered off, then click its label to open its details screen.
    3. Click the Storage -> Disks tab.
    4. Click the Edit icon next to the disk you want to change.
    5. Enter a new disk size in GB in the field provided.
    6. Click the Save Disk button.

Migrate disks

You can migrate disks of your virtual machines to other data stores, which are allocated to the same hypervisor or hypervisor zone. Unlike VM migration – disk migration requires reboot of the VM (despite the template it is based on).

  • To migrate a disk:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Make sure your virtual machine is powered off, then click its label to open its details screen.
    3. Click the Storage -> Disks tab.
    4. Click the Migrate icon next to the disk you want to move to another data store.
    5. On the screen that appears select a target data store from a drop-down box.
  You can only migrate disks to data stores in data store zones assigned to your billing plan. 
    1. Click Start Migrate.
  You cannot migrate a disk to a data store with less capacity than the disk size!

Back up VM disks

  • To back up a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the machine you want to back up.
    3. Click the Storage -> Disks tab. You’ll see a list of the disks allocated to that virtual machine.
    4. Click the Backups icon next to a disk. You’ll see a list of all the backups taken and pending for that disk, along with the tools to restore backups, delete them, and convert them to templates.
      • To make a backup, click the Take Backup button at the end of the list.
      • To restore a backup, click the Restore link next to the backup you want to revert to.
      • To convert a backup into the custom template, click Convert to template link next to the backup (see Create custom templates).

Schedule VM backups

In addition to the system autobackup presets, you can schedule backups of VMs (VM disks) as required. For example, you can set up a schedule to back up your disks once a week.

  • To add a backup schedule:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you want to schedule a backup for.
    3. Click the Disks tab.
    4. On the screen that appears, click the Schedules icon next to the disk you want to back up.
    5. On the screen that follows, click the Add New Schedule button.
    6. Next, enter duration and choose a period from the drop-down menu: daily, weekly, monthly or yearly. The duration determines how frequently the backup will take place according to the period set. For example, duration of 2 and a period of days will take a backup every 2 days.
    7. Click the Save button to finish.
  The combination of Scheduled VM backups and Autobackup Presets provide a great deal of flexibility in the way backups are handled for the cloud, and for individual VMs. Autobackup Presets can be applied to all new VMs added to the cloud. Scheduled VM backups enable specific backups to be scheduled for individual VMs, outside of the autobackup pattern.

Delete VM disks

  • To delete a disk:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Make sure your virtual machine is powered off, then click its label to open its details screen.
    3. Click the Storage -> Disks tab.
    4. Click Delete icon next to the disk you want to delete.

Manage backups

Backups tab lists all backups performed for the VM (off all disks) and enables you to restore or convert them into custom templates.

  • To restore backups or convert them to custom templates:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the machine you require.
    3. Click the Storage -> Backups tab.
    4. You’ll see a list of all the backups taken and pending for that virtual machine, along with the tools to restore backups, delete them, and convert them to templates.
      • To restore a backup, click the Restore link next to the backup you want to revert to.
      • To convert a backup into the custom template, click Convert to template link next to the backup (see Create custom templates).

VM Statistics

For your convenience, the system tracks VM performance and generates statistics on:

  • VM CPU utilization
  • VM Billing statistics
  • Interface Usage
  • Disk IOPS

VM CPU utilization

Cloud1 tracks CPU usage for virtual machines and generates charts that help analyze VM performance. The charts show the total CPU usage for all the cores of this particular VM for a specified time period. The vertical axis has a scale of 0.0-X.0, where 0.0 is 0% and X.0% is 100% of CPU utilization - X depends on the total number of cores used by the VM. The horizontal axis defines a time period.

  • To see CPU usage statistics:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Overview -> CPU Usage tab.
    4. On the screen that appears, the top chart shows CPU usage for the last 24 hours. The bottom chart shows usage for the last three months (if there is enough data). If there less data available, the chart will show utilization for the time available.
    5. Tick the Show in my Timezone box to show bandwidth statistics according to your profile’s timezone settings.
    6. To zoom into a time period, click and drag in a chart. Click the Show all button to zoom out again.
 To see what percentage of hypervisor CPU resource a VM takes, go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu and click the label of the VM you’re interested in. On the screen that appears, the CPU priority will show the amount of CPU resource given to this VM.

VM Billing statistics

Cloud1 has a record of all the charges applied to your VMs for the last three month period. If a virtual machine was created less than three months ago, statistics are recorded for the VM’s existence to date. You can view all statistics available, or those for a shorter period by setting a Start and End time.

  • To view billing statistics for a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Overview -> Billing Statistics tab.
    4. Set Start and End time. By default the statistics are generated for the last three months or the actual VM existence period.
    5. Tick the Show in my Timezone box to show bandwidth statistics according to your profile’s timezone settings.
    6. On the page that appears:
      • Date – particular date and time for the generated statistics
      • Users – the virtual machine owner. Click the owner name to see the User Profile (user details)
      • Virtual Machines – the virtual machine name with the total due for VM resources (CPU priority, CPUs, memory and template resources) for the point of time specified in the Date column.
      • Network Interfaces – the total due for the network interfaces used by this VM for the point of time specified in the Date column. Click the network interface name to see its details.
      • Disks – the list of disks assigned to this VM with the total due for the disk space resources (disk size, data read/written, reads/writes completed) for the point of time specified in the Date column. Click the disk name to see its details.
      • Costs – the total due for the Virtual Machines, Network Interfaces and Disks resources for the point of time specified in the Date column. Scroll down to see Total Amount (the total due for the whole billing statistics period).

Network Interface usage

Cloud1 tracks network usage for virtual machines and generates charts that help analyze network performance.

  • To see network utilization statistics for a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Networking -> Network Interfaces tab.
    4. Click the Statistics (chart) icon next to the network you’re interested in.
    5. On the screen that appears, the top chart shows bandwidth usage for the last 24 hours. The bottom chart shows usage for the last three months.
    6. To zoom into a time period, click and drag in a chart. Click the Show all button to zoom out again.

Disk IOPS

The system tracks IOPS (Input/Output Operations per Second) for virtual machines and generates charts that help analyze VM disk performance.

  • To see IOPS for a virtual machine:
    1. Go to your Control Panel’s Virtual Machines menu.
    2. Click the label of the virtual machine you’re interested in.
    3. Click the Storage -> Disks tab.
    4. Click the Statistics (chart) icon next to the disk you’re interested in. There are four charts on the screen that appears:
      • IOPS for the last hour
      • IOPS for the last 24 hours
      • Data written/read for the last 24 hours
      • Data written/read for the last hour
    5. To zoom into a time period, click and drag in a chart. Click the Show all button to zoom out again.
 The Cloud1 API allows you to limit the Hourly IOPS and Hourly data by setting the limit=N parameter, where the N variable is the number of hours for which the charts will display the info.

Credits